Femme Fatale Hair With Front Flicks – 1971

Posted by on Jun 8, 2018 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

Femme Fatale Hair With Front Flicks – 1971

Photos: Klaus Lucka

Raphael, one of the greatest and sexiest hairdressers of all time, very famous in London and Europe in the 60s as the Raphael of Raphael & Leonard, launched a salon in Montreal with Femmes Fatales, featuring front flicks of hair, soft and romantic, very new then and inspirational now. For more on Raphael and more of his Femme Fatales, CLICK HERE

Hair: Ralphael Santarossa … Makeup: Jacques LaFleur … Model: Donna Clarke
Photos: Klaus Lucka.  Produced by Helen Oppenheim.

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New Modern Blog Just Up. Raphael – 2017

Posted by on Feb 23, 2017 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

New Modern Blog Just Up. Raphael - 2017

Photo: Klaus Lucka

My latest blog is just up on Modern. It is about the surreal supersexy sixties hairdresser phenom Raphael, the once partner of Raphael & Leonard fame.  Leonard, who made Twiggy famous, passed away recently, and that made me think of Raphael.  He was so famous in the 60s, but the fame didn’t last.  Why? I met him when I did the PR launch for his salon in Montreal.  See the photos taken for the launch, not dated, relevant still today, see Raphael in action in  London with Chita Rivera.   Check it out. Click HERE

 

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Raphael’s Femme Fatale Turban Look – 1971

Posted by on Aug 4, 2014 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

Raphael's Femme Fatale Turban Look – 1971

Photo: © Klaus Lucka

Here’s something different. From 1971. By the great Raphael Santarossa, who had tressed superstars and supermodels in London (as the Raphael of Raphael & Leonard) before moving to North America.

For this terrific turban look, Raphael cut and sculpted a fall in 3 steps, into 3 lengths, to look like 3 different fringes on one head. He then strategically placed the hair in the turban to waterfall down one side of the face, softening it.  Note the thin brows of the era, a fad in 1971 but so many found their brows never grew back as they were!  For more Femme Fatales, click here: 

Hair by Raphael Santarossa, 1971 … Makeup: Jacques LaFleur … Turban Designed by: Irene of Montreal … Model: Judi McDonald … Photo: Klaus Lucka … Produced by Helen Oppenheim

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Surreal Raphael – 1971

Posted by on Mar 29, 2014 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

Photo: © Klaus Lucka

Photo: © Klaus Lucka

Fifth in a series featuring the talent in the Archives.  (Series to be continued later. Stay tuned … )

Raphael Santarossa in 1971.  Press photo to launch his new salon and his first Collection, Femme Fatale.  The surreal theme because apart from being one of the great hairdressers of all time, Raphael also painted in a surreal style.  His bio just begins to tell the amazing story about the career and life of this one-of-a-kind hairdresser who cut and tressed famous heads of the superstars and supermodels of his era –  Liz Taylor, Judy Garland, Catherine Deneuve and more. To read the bio, click here To see his Femme Fatale Collection and more, click here

Photo: © Klaus Lucka

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Forehead Flicks, Femme Fatale by Raphael – 1971

Posted by on Mar 15, 2014 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

Photo: © Klaus Lucka

Photo: © Klaus Lucka

Do you know your hair history?  Here’s a Femme Fatale from Raphael’s famous 1971 Collection, this one with flicks flicking on the forehead, very new at the time when flicks only flicked at the ends of long hair.  For other versions of this model’s very fine hair – and other Femme Fatales, click here

Hair: Raphael Santarossa, 1971 … Makeup: Jacques LaFleur … Model: Judi MacDonald …
Photo: © Klaus Lucka
Produced by Helen Oppenheim

 

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First Flicks @ Front, Femme Fatale Donna – 1971

Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

First Flicks @ Front, Femmes Fatale - 1971

Photos: Klaus Lucka

Do you know your hair history?  These three photos are from Raphael’s Femme Fatale Collection, 1971.  The all-one-length bobbed hairstyles featured flicks at the front, flattering the face.  So new, at the time, no one had done anything like them before.  Raphael said these looks were offered as “the answer to those ratty tatty growing-out layered looks” everyone had at the time.  For more Femme Fatales and more info, go to HairThen Raphael on www.helenoppenheim.com

Hair by Raphael Santarossa … Makeup: Jacques LaFleur … Model: Donna Clarke … Photo: Klaus Lucka … Produced by Helen Oppenheim

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Profile on Helen Oppenheim in Launchpad – 2013

Posted by on Jun 4, 2013 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

Helen Oppenheim Profile in Launchpad - 2O13

Launchpad June 2013

Launchpad Conversations Profile on Helen Oppenheim, title Past Perfect. Some of the firsts.   Full page, 5 photos (4 La Coupe, 1 Raphael) on website.  And top photo on Index page.  Thank you Marianne Dougherty and Launchpad.  Top photo, 60s hair, first layered look, by Charles Booth, La Coupe …2nd photo: 70s hair, first waved bob by Kim Lepine … 3rd photo: 70s hair, Détente with first decorated wave clips, by Kim Lepine … 4th photo: 70s hair, first French braiding by Antonio da Costa Rocha … bottom photo: 70s hair, Femme Fatale, first flips at front by Raphael  – go to HairThen on helenoppenheim.com for more on the hair and see Launchpad to read more on me!

Profile on Helen Oppenheim in Launchpad – 2013

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Raphael’s Femme Fatale – 1971

Posted by on May 3, 2013 in Helen's Blog | 0 comments

Raphael's Femme Fatale - 1971

Photo: Klaus Lucka

Femme Fatale by Raphael Santarossa.  This is one of many looks with flicks at the front that Raphael created in 1971, very new then.   Raphael, one of the great hairdressers of all time, was  very famous in London and Europe in the 60s, as the Raphael of Raphael & Leonard.  I launched his salon when he arrived in Montreal and this was one of the great photos from our opening press release by the hairdresser who loved women!    For more on Raphael, go to About, and for more Femme Fatale photos, go to the Archives – HairThen, Raphael, on www.helenoppenheim.com

Hair: Ralphael …Makeup: Jacques LaFleur … Model: Donna Clarke … Photo: Klaus Lucka.  Produced by Helen Oppenheim.
 

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